Class Schedule – Punta Gorda

Edison State College, Charlotte Campus

26300 Airport Rd, Punta Gorda, FL 33950

LEARNING – JUST FOR THE FUN OF IT!

Walking Tours of Punta Gorda’s Historic MuralsRon Norsell
Mondays, January 27 or February 17, 10:00 a.m. – Rain Dates February 3 and February 24
ONE DAY ONLY – Meet at Laishley Park Municipal Marina

Have you ever wondered about the murals of Punta Gorda? Why they are here and what they represent? Put on some comfortable walking shoes and join us for an interesting two-hour tour. You’ll learn about Punta Gorda and its rich heritage. These walking tours will begin at the south end of the parking lot of Laishley Park Municipal Marina. Please meet there and plan to arrive 10 minutes early.

Ron Norsell is a lifelong history buff. He moved to Punta Gorda following his retirement from an international business career that fed and cultivated his interest in history. The murals around town impressed him, and his curiosity inspired him to learn more. By coincidence a friend asked him to consider joining the Punta Gorda Historic Mural Society. He writes, “What an opportunity! I jumped at the chance and the rest is history.” Today, he feels privileged to serve as the society president and carry on the legacy of founder Dr. Robert Andrews.

JANUARY 27 TOUR SOLD OUT

FEBRUARY 17 TOUR SOLD OUT

The Just Society in a Post-Modern World Howard Goldson
Mondays, January 27 – February 17, 1:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Room E-121 (4 weeks)

In the last two decades of the 20th century the world changed. New and unique questions concerning the meaning of freedom, justice, and human dignity arose. This course explores some of these questions through the eyes of Martha Nussbaum, Nancy Fraser, David Graeber, and others. We will encourage discussion for the purpose of exposing questions confronting modern societies and allowing participants to formulate reasoned opinions about the answers.

Howard Goldson received a Juris Doctor degree from St. John’s University and practiced law in New York for 50 years before retiring in 2009. In the 1980s, he completed course work for Master’s degree in philosophy at SUNY Stonybrook but never wrote the dissertation to receive the degree. Since his retirement, he devotes his time to abstract painting, studying philosophy (the area of social justice), and presenting courses at the Lifetime Learning Institute at Bard College.

Member Price: $40.00


Non-Member Price: $45.00

Comparative ReligionsDr. Mark Ehman
Mondays, January 27 – February 17, 3:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
Room E-121 (4 weeks)

This course will be a continuation of the LLI course “World Religions” conducted by Dr. Mark Ehman during the 2013 Fall Term. Two sessions will focus on Judaism and two on Christianity. Ehman has traveled extensively and has written and published on a wide range of religious topics, comparative religions, and philosophy.

Dr. Mark Ehman holds a PhD in Buddhist studies and a Master’s degree in Indian studies from the University of Wisconsin. He has taught both at the college and high school level in Florida including Edison State College, Florida Gulf Coast University, Barry University, and Nova Southeastern University as well as Springfield College. His language skills include Spanish, French, German, Sanskrit, Pali, Greek, and Chinese.

Member Price: $40.00


Non-Member Price: $45.00

Rape of Nanking (WWII)Anthony Ciampa Jr.
Monday, February 10, 10:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Room E-121 (ONE DAY ONLY)

This course discusses the treatment of, and atrocities inflicted upon, Chinese soldiers and citizens by the Japanese occupying forces during the siege and eventual occupation of Nanking during the invasion of China in 1937. It also examines the cultural, military, and political reasons behind this treatment of the Chinese people, in addition to the role of the international community during this period.

Anthony Ciampa Jr. holds an AB in chemistry/biology from Boston University, an MBA in marketing from Northeastern University, and an Executive MBA from Penn State University. His interests include traveling, scuba diving, and the history of World War II (Pacific and European Theatres).

Member Price: $10.00


Non-Member Price: $15.00

Four Descriptive Nature Hikes on Trails in Charlotte and DeSoto CountiesJohn Phillips
Tuesdays, February 18 and 25, March 4 and 11, 8:30 a.m. – Various Locations
Meet at Edison State College Campus

Please note that each walk takes 2 – 3 hours. Participants should meet at 8:30 a.m. at Edison campus in the parking lot in front of the Auditorium, then follow the instructor to the location of the hike. The instructor may be able to take several participants in his vehicle. Each hike is limited to 20 people. Due to the conditions of the trails, participants should be in good physical condition and dress appropriately.

Tuesday, February 18: Charlotte Flatwoods Preserve
This is a Charlotte County preserve consisting of pine flatwoods, wetland marsh, and freshwater pond habitats. The trail circles a wetlands marsh.  A number of wading birds can usually be seen, along with carrion eating birds such as vultures and eagles. It will also be a place where participants can see and learn about a number of exotic, invasive plant species.

Member Price: $10.00


Non-Member Price: $15.00

Tuesday, February 25: Deep Creek Preserve
This is a Southwest Water Management preserve consisting of well-managed pine flatwoods, wetland marshes, and hardwood hammock habitats. Possible animal species that might be seen include white-tailed deer, wild hogs, a variety of birds, and gopher tortoises.  A variety of plant species that grow in the different habitats will be seen and discussed.

Member Price: $10.00


Non-Member Price: $15.00

Tuesday, March 4: Shell Creek Preserve
This is a Charlotte County preserve purchased with special funds dedicated to the Conservation Charlotte program.  It consists of pine flatwoods, scrub, and hardwood hammocks bordering Shell Creek. A wide variety of birds will be seen as well as plants in an interesting sequence of habitats from dry pine flatwoods, through overgrown scrub, to the hardwood hammock bordering Shell Creek.

Member Price: $10.00


Non-Member Price: $15.00

Tuesday, March 11: Footprints Trail
This is a trail designed and built by graduates of the Florida Master Naturalist Program on the State-owned Babcock Ranch. It traverses through pine flatwoods, wet prairie, and a cypress swamp. Animal species that might be seen include white-tailed deer, wild hogs, wild turkeys, and a wide variety of birds.

Member Price: $10.00


Non-Member Price: $15.00

John Phillips is a retired college administrator form northern New York State. He is a graduate of the New York State Ranger School, earned a BS in communication arts and an MS in extension education from Cornell University, and earned another MS in higher education administration from SUNY at Albany. He is a Florida Master Naturalist and certified as an instructor in the Florida Master Naturalist program.

The Short Stories of Flannery O’ConnorDorothy Howe Brooks and Craig E. Anderson
Tuesdays, January 21 – February 25, 10:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Room E-121 (6 weeks)

We will read and explore a sampling of the short stories of Flannery O’Connor, one of America’s greatest short story writers, as well as reflect on what elements make for a good short story. The course will give attention to the author’s personal faith, philosophy, and life – including her long struggle with illness. Prior to the first session, it is recommended that students read “The Geranium.” Also, students should have a copy of The Complete Stories of Flannery O’Connor. Copperfish Books of Punta Gorda offers a 20 percent discount if five or more books are ordered. Please contact Dorothy Howe Brooks at dotreg@earthlink.net if you wish to order the book.

Dorothy Howe Brooks writes poetry and fiction. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in numerous literary magazines. She has a Master’s degree in education from Tulane University, and taught fiction writing in the continuing education division of Kennesaw State University in Atlanta. Her full-length book of poetry, A Fine Dusting of Brightness, was published in August 2013 by Aldrich Press.

Craig E. Anderson received a degree in English literature from Ohio University, a Master’s degree in theology from North Park Theological Seminary, and a doctorate in church ministry from Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, Berkeley. He is a former president of LLI and has taught two previous LLI classes on poetry. He is a retired pastor and church administrator.

Member Price: $60.00


Non-Member Price: $65.00

Great Decisions: The Foreign Policy Association’s Annual PresentationHasan Hammami
Tuesdays, January 21 – February 25, 1:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Room E-119 (6 weeks)

LLI is proud to offer the 2014 Foreign Policy Association course. The topics will include political Islam in Africa, China’s foreign policy, Turkey, Israel, energy independence, economic statecraft and trade, defense and the rise of new technologies, and food security and climate change. LLI will also offer a special encore in 2014 on Syria. Please note that topics may change as dictated by the Foreign Policy Association.

Hasan Hammami was born in Jaffa, Palestine and became a refugee at age 15. He has been a United States citizen for over 30 years and is a resident of Punta Gorda. He was educated at the Christian Brothers College in Jaffa; the National College in Choueifat, Lebanon; the American University of Beirut, Lebanon; and the University of Nottingham, Nottingham, England, in addition to coursework at the Sloan School of Management at MIT. He continues to travel extensively through the Middle East.

Member Price: $60.00


Non-Member Price: $65.00

Hooray for Florida!Jacqueline Brown
Tuesdays, January 21 – January 28, 3:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
Room E-121 (2 weeks)

Did you know that films have been shot in Florida since the Spanish-American War? Or that Florida is third only to California and New York? The film industry brought over 8.5 billion dollars to Florida’s economy in 2007 and it grows each year. Learn about the history of film in Florida in this exciting class.

Historical Program Coordinator Jacqueline Brown joined the Charlotte County Historical Center team in 2008, bringing with her both academic and practical experience. Brown researches, organizes, and produces the educational programs and events of the Charlotte County Historical Center on Bayshore Road in Charlotte Harbor. A longtime resident, she earned her BA in history from Florida Gulf Coast University. She is a member of Phi Alpha Theta, the Organization of American Historians, the Florida Historical Society, and the Charlotte County Historical Society. She also co-authored scholarly work on Afro-Cuban segregation in late 19th century Tampa and continues her research in local and state history.

CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Reading the Night SkiesDavid Hanson
Tuesdays, January 21 – February 11, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
James & Barbara Moore Observatory (4 weeks)

This ever-popular course in the James & Barbara Moore Observatory provides an introduction to the stars and planets, and uses classroom and observatory techniques. Students will be treated to discussions of the sky as seen from southwest Florida in addition to locating planets, constellations, special stars, and galaxies. Modern topics in astronomy along with myths and legends will also be presented. Please note that while the observatory lobby is air conditioned, the observatory part of the building is not.

David Hanson earned his MA in physics from the University of Northern Iowa and has over 49 years’ teaching experience, including both high school and collegiate levels in addition to industrial education.

Member Price: $40.00


Non-Member Price: $45.00

Panaceas or Poisons: The True Nature of Nutritional SupplementsJohn Fenton, PhD
Tuesdays, February 4 – February 25, 3:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
Room E-121 (4 weeks)

This course examines the role of supplements in human health. Can supplements treat our depressions, raise our cardiac function, lower our excess body weight, and address a myriad of other health issues? We will examine the claims and the hype and, mostly, the science that has been employed to evaluate nutritional supplements.

Dr. John Fenton received a PhD in biochemistry from the University of Minnesota. He did post-doctoral research at the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research and at Loyola University Medical Center, received specialized training in clinical chemistry and toxicology, and authored many research papers and several books in these areas. He is a retired professor of chemistry and toxicology, and a retired director of clinical chemistry and toxicology testing, Crozer-Keystone Health Systems located in Pennsylvania.

Member Price: $40.00


Non-Member Price: $45.00

Petra: A Historical and Architectural Wonder of the WorldSharon Graham
Wednesday, January 22, 10:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Room E-121 (ONE DAY ONLY)

Imagine the surprise of Swiss traveler Johann Ludwig Burckhardt when he came upon Petra, the “Rose City,” in 1812. Petra, Jordan became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985. Sharon Graham will present a class about her travel to this beautiful place, home to the Horites, Egyptians, Nabataeans, Romans, Jews, Greeks and Byzantines.

Sharon Graham and her husband Joe are independent travelers who have been to many places around the world. Sharon writes, teaches, and lectures about her experiences. Graham was a medical technologist in Pennsylvania for 30 years before moving to Punta Gorda in 2003.

Member Price: $10.00


Non-Member Price: $15.00

Income Growth, Economic Inequality, and Labor Market Evolution: Beyond the Headlines Gene Laber
Wednesdays, January 22 – February 19, 1:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Room E-121 (5 weeks)

As the U.S. economy limps along in a slow recovery from the Great Recession, much discussion in the news media has focused on developments in the labor market and related changes in the incomes and wellbeing of American families. While assertions that the middle class in the United States is declining and that household incomes have stagnated may be popular political slogans, economic reality is more complicated. This class will examine the growth of household incomes, wealth creation, and the changing labor market. These analyses will include discussions of income distribution, wealth inequality, the minimum wage, and economic mobility.

Gene Laber is professor emeritus at the University of Vermont. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Maryland and was on the faculty of the University of Vermont, where he taught courses in economics and finance for 28 years. He has consulted with numerous corporations, testified as an expert witness in regulatory proceedings and court cases in various states, and served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Vermont Municipal Bond Bank.

Member Price: $50.00


Non-Member Price: $55.00

Four Short Classic American NovelsJoan Mountford
Wednesdays, February 5 – February 26, 10:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Room E-121 (4 weeks)

This class will deal each week with a different novel by four giants of American Literature: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea, John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men, and J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye. If you somehow missed one of these gems, this is a chance to read and share your ideas about it. Even better, if you read it years ago, read it again and see how you feel about it now that you’re no longer wet behind the ears. Students should provide their own copies of the novels and should read/reread The Great Gatsby prior to the first session so that it may be discussed.

Joan Mountford, a winter resident of Punta Gorda, holds degrees from Tufts University and Simmons College.  She lives most of the year in New Hampshire, where she taught high school English for 35 years, frequently presenting workshops at state and regional conferences.  In addition, she has for a number of years been an occasional columnist for the Concord Monitor, the newspaper in the state capital.

Member Price: $40.00


Non-Member Price: $45.00

Lasting Impressions in Modern Art: From Corot to Picasso and BeyondRoxanne Hanney, PhD
Thursdays, January 23 – February 13, 10:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Room E-121 (4 weeks)

What makes a work of art truly timeless? Why are certain painters still so beloved today, and others less so? Where does modern art begin? In this course we will consider the evolution of artistic styles from the early 19th century through to the modern era, stopping along the way to explore the personal preferences of students. Starting with the Impressionists and their forerunners, we will follow the evolution of the prominent artists of the current age. Discussions will be based on a PowerPoint presentation featuring samples of artwork, along with small group and whole class activities. Join us for this enriching visual adventure and add your own perceptions to the journey.

Roxanne Hanney, PhD, has had a 30-year career in education in Wisconsin. She writes, “I always describe myself as a teacher, although my career path led to several related incarnations: high school French teacher, part-time lecturer at the college level, middle school principal, and supervisor of student teachers. However, the 12 years I spent teaching French remain the most memorable to me. With my lifelong interest in art and art history, I am now eager to refashion myself as a teacher of adult students, particularly in art-related subject areas.”

Member Price: $40.00


Non-Member Price: $45.00

Judging Shakespeare: Is the Merchant of Venice Anti-Semitic?Sharon Whitehill, PhD
Thursdays, January 23 – February 13, 1:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Room E-119 (4 weeks)

This course will first demonstrate that Shakespeare’s plays—especially the comedies—can be enjoyed by all of us, not just by a literary elite. Next, by studying the play in detail, we’ll discuss the presentation of Shylock the Jew. Are there grounds for saying that Shakespeare was sympathetic to Jews, or was he anti-Semitic along with his peers? We’ll conclude by watching excerpts from two DVD portrayals of Shylock, one by Laurence Olivier and the other by Al Pacino. If you were the judge, which one would win the blue ribbon for the most authentic performance? Students should provide their own unabridged edition of The Merchant of Venice; the Signet Classic paperback edition is recommended.

Dr. Sharon Whitehill has a PhD in English literature and taught at the university level in Michigan for 32 years. Since retirement, her love of teaching has taken the form of sermons, lectures, and adult education classes (including a number of courses for LLI at Edison College) in literature, film, mythology, and spiritual consciousness.

CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Improved Health, Fitness, and Foods at Any AgeShari Leiterman
Thursdays, January 23 – February 13, 3:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
Room E-121 (4 weeks)

This course is for those interested in taking charge of their health, fitness, medicine cabinet, and overall well-being. It covers four topics: improved digestion, eating better and losing weight; essential oils for overall health benefits and the power of aromatherapy; fitness at any age; and massage techniques. Come with a great attitude, learn, and share.

Shari Leiterman has been a Raw Foods Coach, Educator, Speaker, Caterer, and a Specialized Presenter for over 20 years. She holds a BS in exercise physiology and BA in organizational communications.  She embodies fitness and a raw/vegan foods lifestyle, and teaches a holistic approach for achieving your potential for health.

Member Price: $40.00


Non-Member Price: $45.00

 

If you prefer to register via mail please click Membership and Class Registration for a registration form.

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